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Poet

1 poem available

I have walked a great while over the snow, and I am not tall nor strong. My clothes are wet, and my teeth are set, and the way was hard and long. - Mary Elizabeth Coleridge 'The Witch'

Poet

G. K. Chesterton

B. 1874 D. 1936

1 poem available

Before the Roman came to Rye or out to Severn strode, the rolling English drunkard made the rolling English road. - G.K. Chesterton 'The Rolling English Road'

Poet

Amy Lowell

B. 1874 D. 1925

1 poem available

Spilt is that liquor, my too hasty hand threw down the cup, and did not understand. - Amy Lowell 'A Blockhead'

Poet

Samuel Johnson

B. 1709 D. 1784

1 poem available

Condemn'd to hope's delusive mine, as on we toil from day to day, by sudden blasts, or slow decline, our social comforts drop away. - Samuel Johnson 'On the death of Dr Robert Levet'

Poet

Arthur Hugh Clough

B. 1819 D. 1861

1 poem available

'There is no God,' the wicked saith, 'and truly it's a blessing, for what he might have done with us it's better only guessing.? - Arthur Hugh Clough 'There Is No God'

Poet

5 poems available

The divisions of real life can disappear in poetry. Partly through metaphor, partly through the surprise of a poet's vision, we are shown a landscape that is both with and without walls.

Poet

6 poems available

We belong to the houses we live in. ('Hoopoe')

Poet

4 poems available

Birthcries repeatedly / new, self pull out self, self / issuing that self home - Vahni Capildeo, 'On Not Writing as a West Indian Woman'

Poet

5 poems available

No matter how compelling her themes, with their demands of compassion and political conscience, Satyamurti never loses hold of her main topic: the capacity of language. Bernard O'Donoghue, Poetry London

Poet

4 poems available

Her quietly assured verse demonstrates its real sophistication in the intelligence of its commentary. To put it another way, she says such interesting things that you want to know what comes next. - Independent

Poet

John Milton

B. 1608 D. 1674

3 poems available

Of Man's first disobedience, and the fruit / Of that forbidden tree whose mortal taste / Brought death into the world, and all our woe. 'Paradise Lost'

Poet

4 poems available

A dynamic reader, Eggleton has a rapid-fire delivery that releases a torrent of images, some startling, ugly, or funny - Greg O'Brien

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